Kimo poems are an Israeli version of haiku. Apparently, there was a need for more syllables in Hebrew. That said, most of the rules are still familiar:
3 lines.
No rhymes.
10 syllables in the first line, 7 in the second, and 6 in the third.

Also, the kimo is focused on a single frozen image (kind of like a snapshot). So it’s uncommon to have any movement happening in kimo poems.

Sipping white wine; eyes fixed on the doorway.

The old tavern filled up.

She kept staring. Waiting.

Susan Marie Shuman/SusanWritesPrecise
Shutterstock,com

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